viernes, 23 de junio de 2017

Z Fish Report (6/22/17)

Jeff Johnson with a nice pompano taken with a live bait and spin rod.
We had some hard rains this week, starting on Sunday. Technically it was not a named storm, but the area covered was massive. Whether you were offshore, or inshore, combined with the huge surf, fishing was tough.

Offshore (average) surface water temperature - Includes from the 5-6 mile mark at the 100 fathom line, then to the 1,000 fathom line being at 32 miles: 84°.
Inshore (average) surface temperature. From the beach to about 5 miles: 84°
Blue water: (Chlorophyll amounts and surface temps from Terrafin SST) Blue from the 100 fathom line to way out. Even though the heavy rains blew open the sand bars in front of the rivers, the strong blue water current is cleaning the inshore up. The inshore now has only has stained water for a couple of hundred yards off the beach.
Offshore- As predicted, Blue marlin are showing up. And, with calming weather and seas, a few sailfish were taken on Wednesday. There have even been a few dorado taken. Fishing with French clients, Cheva on the panga Dos Hermanos II, got 3 sailfish (released) on Wednesday, and an 18 pound dorado (dinner). 
The small rooster we got down at Puerto Vicente. The smaller, and quicker
fish beat about a 40 pound rooster to the lure, by only a heartbreaking 6 inches.
 Inshore: All last week the roosterfish numbers were excellent, with Cheva and Adolfo both having a few 8 fish days, plus up to 15 large jack crevalle on the same day. The rains really put a damper to it. On Wednesday, Adolfo, also fishing with French clients on the panga Dos Hermanos, got one 40 pound rooster, and 15 small dorado to 8 pounds. They were fishing the Barra Potosi area.
Jeff Johnson of Fort Worth TX fished with me down at Puerto Vicente Guerrero on Thursday. They had more rain down south than we had up here in the Zihuatanejo area, and the inshore was still a bit murky. We had to work hard for the couple of jack crevalle we got, a large pompano, and a small roosterfish. Plus, the waves were still large and dangerous.
By this weekend, all up and down the coast, the conditions should be a lot better.  
Ed Kunze                                                                            

 (Director of the Roosterfish Foundation, IGFA Representative)






jueves, 1 de junio de 2017

Z Fish Report (6/1/17)

Mrs. Xavier and Cheva with a very nice rooster
The good news is the water is cleaning up and getting warmer again. And, the roosters are coming back. It is nice to get back to the historical pattern, and not have the El Niño of the last couple of years fooling around with the currents and bait patterns.

June is probably my favorite month of the year, with November being second. June is the best month of the year for roosters. And, we have yellowfin tuna, blue marlin, a few sailfish, the tasty sierras and chulas, and the abundant jack crevalle which we were getting in March and April have all added 8-10 pounds on. But no tourists. November has dorado, sailfish, roosters, and more tourists. 

Offshore (average) surface water temperature - Includes from the 5-6 mile mark at the 100 fathom line, then to the 1,000 fathom line being at 32 miles: 83°.
Inshore (average) surface temperature. From the beach to about 5 miles: 83°
Last week, Christian Caldwell  fished with Cheva for this 30 pound class tuna
Blue water: (Chlorophyll amounts and surface temps from Terrafin SST) Blue from the 100 fathom line to way out. The inshore is also cleaning up.
Note the bent pole on the right of the photo where Rick's wife is also hooked up.
Offshore- The yellowfin tuna are still here, but not in the numbers as the last few weeks. They are showing up from 4 miles off the beach, to 10 miles, and averaging about 15 pounds. This is the month for blue marlin and large tuna, so expect to see some in the counts over the next few weeks.   
Rick's rooster
Inshore: Cheva, on the panga Dos Hermanos II, only fished one day with Rick Xavier and his wife. They are from San Diego. But, it was a very good day. They got it started and kind of warmed up with a few black skipjack tuna. Then they got serious with 10 nice sized jack crevalle, some sierras, and two very nice roosterfish. They were fishing the Petatlan area.
Ed Kunze                                                                            

 (Director of the Roosterfish Foundation, IGFA Representative)

jueves, 25 de mayo de 2017

Z Fish Report (5/25/17)

Offshore (average) surface water temperature - Includes from the 5-6 mile mark at the 100 fathom line, then to the 1,000 fathom line being at 32 miles: 83°.
Inshore (average) surface temperature. From the beach to about 5 miles: definitely a typical warming trend at 83°
Blue water: (Chlorophyll amounts and surface temps from Terrafin SST) Really mixed. Blue and green all over the place.
Offshore- Spotty blue water and cool water temperatures still have the offshore very slow. But the yellowfin tuna are here. They are showing up from 4 miles off the beach, to 10 miles, and averaging about 15 pounds,  
Inshore: The dirty inshore water has slowed down most all species. However, just a couple of hundred yards off the beach, we are getting the tasty sierras, the hard fighting jack crevalle, and black skipjack tuna (called bonitos here by the captains). And the white meated Chulas have shown up. They are a member of the tuna family, with a serious set of dentures. Chulas are rarely taken on surface lures, rather small trolled Rapalas. They are great table fare.
The mid-sized jack crevalle exploded a couple of days ago off the river bar Valentine, but the water is still green there.
Cheva, on the panga Dos Hermanos II, fished with Christian "Cubby" Caldwell from New York for a small rooster on the 9wt fly rod, a large 20 pound jack crevalle on live bait with the spin gear, and a 30 pound yellowfin tuna on a Mega Bait with spin gear. All were taken in the area of the White Rocks.
Ed Kunze                                                                            
 (Director of the Roosterfish Foundation, IGFA Representative

jueves, 4 de mayo de 2017

Z Fish Report (5/4/17)


Offshore (average) surface water temperature - Includes from the 5-6 mile mark at the 100 fathom line, then to the 1,000 fathom line being at 32 miles: 80°.  (see below)
Inshore (average) surface temperature. From the beach to about 5 miles: definitely a typical April cooling trend - very cool 78°
Blue water: See below. (Chlorophyll amounts and surface temps from Terrafin SST) Cloud cover obscures a lot of the map, but the blue water is trying to get back in, with large areas of green water and even some areas of red tide. In another week or so, the blue water should be dominant.
Offshore Action- Spotty blue water and cool water temperatures still have the offshore very slow.
The annual sailfish kill tournament starts tomorrow (Friday). Prizes are given to the 3 largest sailfish, a prize for the largest marlin, and another for the largest dorado. And I am 100% against any aspect of it, except the 10 kilo limit of the dorado. At least the dorado are still abundant, but who knows for how long.
In the 20 years past, the average percipients have averaged between 125-135 boats, and I have seen as many as 165 entries. But this year, by 4:00 this afternoon, it was 237 boats. Incredible!
Don’t plan on fishing offshore for at least a week after the tournament is over (this Sunday, the 7th) The water will have beat to death.
Paul Phillips’ (Fintastic Tag and Release Tournaments) and I had pushed for a 30 kilo (66 pounds) minimum size several years back, and we succeeded. Due to overfishing and long lines, the size is getting smaller every year. So what happens is if the fish does not meet the 30 kilo limit? The Mexican angler justifies killing the fish hoping it qualifies, and if not, he is sure to get some of his money back in the form of food. It is still basically a 100% kill tournament, unless Gringo anglers are on the boat, who actually respect the rules.   
Also, note that Paul’s IGFA sanctioned rules for the very first Total Tag and Release Tournament here in Mexico are still used by the IGFA in their tournaments worldwide.   
Inshore: The dirty inshore water has slowed down most all species. However, just a couple of hundred yards off the beach, we are getting the tasty sierras, the hard fighting jack crevalle, and black skipjack tuna (called bonitos here by the captains).
Ed Kunze                                                                            

 (Director of the Roosterfish Foundation, IGFA Representative)

jueves, 20 de abril de 2017

Z Fish Report (4/20/17)


Offshore (average) surface water temperature - Includes from the 5-6 mile mark at the 100 fathom line, on out to about 12 miles with 81°, then to the 1,000 fathom line being at 32 miles: 83°.  (see below)
Inshore (average) surface temperature. From the beach to about 5 miles: definitely a typical April cooling trend - very cool 78°
Blue water: See below. (Chlorophyll amounts and surface temps from Terrafin SST) You will note the inshore has some very dirty water, and almost a red tide in some locations. Again, this is what happens during a typical April cooling trend. Historically, by the end of the 1st week in May, everything will be back to normal.
Offshore- Very slow, especially with the green water pushing out. A very typical April.
Inshore: The dirty inshore water has slowed down most all species. However, just a couple of hundred yards off the beach, we are getting the tasty sierras, the hard fighting jack crevalle, and black skipjack tuna (called bonitos here by the captains).
Ken Baskin of Houston, TX has been inshore fishing here for over 10 years, but by using cheaper boats I have always told him he is only getting a boat ride. This week he finally gave in and told me to get him set up with one of the boats I recommend. Adolfo was available and they fished the inshore areas around Manzanillo Bay, just north of Troncones. It was 11:00 when Ken called me and said they were worn out and heading back to the pier. He, and his fishing partner, had caught 44 gamefish, including black skipjacks, jack crevalle, a red snapper, several tasty sierras, and even 2 small roosters. He told me he hadn’t even seen a rooster before, and he had never caught this many fish on any day he had been on the water here.
So, the fish and inshore action is here, but you need a captain who really understands the concept.
Ed Kunze                                                                            

 (Director of the Roosterfish Foundation, IGFA Representative)

jueves, 6 de abril de 2017

Z Fish Report (4/6/17)

Adolfo Jr with a client  from last week, and a huge rooster taken down at
Vicente Guerrero. But, thee roosters are far and few between.
Offshore (average) surface water temperature - Includes from the 5-6 mile mark at the 100 fathom line, on out to about 12 miles with 81°, then to the 1,000 fathom line being at 32 miles: 83°.
Inshore (average) surface temperature. From the beach to about 5 miles: Definitely a typical April cooling trend - very cool  at 78°
Blue water: See below. (Chlorophyll amounts and surface temps from Terrafin SST) You will note the inshore has some very dirty water, and almost a red tide in some locations. Again, this is what happens during a typical April cooling trend. Historically, by the end of the 1st week in May, everything will be back to normal.
Offshore- We have yellowfin tuna (15 to 30 pounds), and blue marlin. But, they are out between 40-45 miles. We have very few sport fishing anglers, so the commercial pangeros are the ones doing the catching. There are a few sailfish, but again, it is about 20-30 miles.
No dorado have been reported.
Mark Denison (blue shirt in the middle) with Terry and Eric of Helena, MT,
with the jack crevalle and sierra they got down at Puerto Vicente.  The
captain, Julio, is on the far right. The kids have helped us, since I started the trend,
18 years ago The shorter of these kids are a 2nd generation for 
helping us load and unload the panga. They get 10 pesos each, and often 
beat us as we drive out, to the store to buy a candy.
Inshore: The dirty inshore water has slowed down most all species. However, just a couple of hundred yards off the beach, we are getting the tasty sierras, the hard fighting jack crevalle, and black skipjack tuna (called bonitos here by the captains).
Mark got back his lucky shorts. He has had them for 20
years. It got to be I told him to either change his shorts,
 or at least the location to take the photo. The photos started to
look like the same fish from last year, or the year, before
 They got sewed back up and on the first day, he is back in
business. At a different location
Mark Denison, from his fishing lodge on the beach at La Barritra, has been doing as well as anybody for both the shore fishing and from a panga down at Puerto Vicente Guerrero.
Ed Kunze                                                                            

 (Director of the Roosterfish Foundation, IGFA Representative)

jueves, 23 de marzo de 2017

Z Fish Report (3/23/17)


Offshore (average) surface water temperature - Includes from the 5-6 mile mark at the 100 fathom line, on out to about 50 miles with the 1,000 fathom line being at 32 miles: 82°.
Inshore (average) surface temperature. From the beach to about 5 miles: 81°

Blue water: See below. The white areas are cloud cover. (Chlorophyll amounts and surface temps from Terrafin SST)

This morning, Anibel, Cheva’s oldest son, lives close to me in Coacayul, and I spotted him waiting for a combi to take him to Zihuat. He works with Temo on the panga Suquestra Amor (Steal Your Love). And is a captain himself, taking a second boat when Temo has another client. I picked him up on his way to the municipal pier, and gave him a ride. He immediately started speaking in English, which astounded me. On the pier in the mornings at 5:30, everything among us captains is Spanish. Many a person has asked me in the past, if the captain speaks English. Sometimes I do not have a clue. This was an eye opener, and Anibel told me this.  
Offshore- He went out yesterday. The blue water was perfect, and all conditions were excellent. But, there were no fish. They had one strike on a sailfish on a long day. There were no other signs for birds, bait, dorado, or tuna.   
Inshore: Anibel also told me, what I had already known from Adolfo and Cheva, on the Dos Hermanos pangas, the action for roosters is very good when making the long run to Puerto Vicente Guerrero. The fish are concentrated in the Calvario area. He also told me he got into some large jack crevalle (from 18 to 20 pounds)at the river mouth of Vanentine, which was a fly fisherman’ dream, with 5 to 6 of the large jacks chasing the hookless Ranger lure popper on every cast. After 8 fish, the client said “no more”, and they headed back to the pier.
Ed Kunze                                                                            

 (Director of the Roosterfish Foundation, IGFA Representative)