jueves, 14 de febrero de 2019

Z Fish Report (2/14/19)

On the panga Dos Hermanos with Adolfo
Offshore (average) surface water temperature - Includes from the 5 - 6 mile mark at the 100 fathom line, then to the 1,000 fathom line being about 32 miles: 84°

Inshore (average) surface temperature. From the beach to about 5 miles: 82°
Blue water: (Chlorophyll amounts and surface temps from Terrafin SST) Very similar to last week, with almost blue water from the 100 fathom line, to way out. The slight discoloring of the water near the beach has helped the inshore bite.
Liin with one of two sails. Later, he fought an estimated 400 pound plus
blue marlin on the panga Porpy with Noe.
Offshore: Still slower than should be expected. With the full moon period coming next week, the season for sailfish is basically over, until the mini migration comes again in July. This last couple of years has seen more sailfish per day of fishing, than January.
The boats going out 20 to 25 miles are each averaging two sailfish a day this week. Plus, there have been a few blue marlin showing up in the same area.
This last Sunday, fishing with Noe on the panga Porpy, Linn and Karen Unger from Saskatoon, Canada caught 2 sails and 1 large blue marlin. They were able to release 1 sail and fought the Marlin for over an hour before he spit the hook, Noe estimated the Marlin at 200 KG (about 440 pounds). They also had a great day seeing numerous sea turtles and porpoise.  


Dorado and yellowfin tuna are scarce.
Above and below, with Adolfo on the panga Dos Hermanos at Calvario 


Inshore: The inshore is still holding up very well. There are roosters, and they still remain down south at Vicente Guerrero. On Tuesday, Adolfo on the panga Dos Hermanos, made the long run to Calvario and found the roosters big time. It was a huge migrating school, and they were on the feed. He told me it was one of his best days ever for quantity and quality. And, that is saying something.
A second day at Calvario with Adolfo


Kyler Ries of Seattle, spin fished with Cheva on the panga Dos Hermanos II this last Monday. Kyler got worn out by the number of larger than normal sized black skipjacks, jack crevalle, and sierras he caught. He told me it was a great day on the water.  
Ed Kunze
(Director of the Roosterfish Foundation, IGFA Representative)



jueves, 7 de febrero de 2019

Z Fish Report (2/7/19)

Brian Hetland, with the spin rod and Adolfo Jr.


Offshore (average) surface water temperature - Includes from the 5 - 6 mile mark at the 100 fathom line, then to the 1,000 fathom line being about 32 miles: 82°

Inshore (average) surface temperature. From the beach to about 5 miles: 81°
Blue water: (Chlorophyll amounts and surface temps from Terrafin SST) Almost blue water from the 100 fathom line, to way out. The slight discoloring of the water near the beach has really turned on the inshore fishing for the roosterfish. (See below photo). There are some heavy fresh water discharges from the Rio Balsas to the north, creating green water.



Offshore: Still not good, considering the time of year and moon phase. The boats are averaging two sailfish a day, and no dorado. Also, there is no sign of tuna within 40 miles of the port.
On Tuesday, Adolfo (panga Dos Hermanos) released 4 sailfish for his clients from Poland. On Wednesday, Adolfo Jr. fished with long time visitor Brian Hetland of North Dakota. Brian is a spin fisherman and hooked two nice sails on spin gear. Jr. used his experience with me for teasing for fly fishing, and did the bait and switch.
Adolfo had to rent a 4th panga this year to keep up with the demand. I remember several years ago, when Adolfo told me his son’s future was the inshore and fly fishing, and asked me to train his son. Jr. was 15 and fished with me on weekends and school vacations. He learned well. We fished together until Jr. graduated from high school at the age of 18. He then went on to become the deckhand for his dad. He is now a captain.
Above and all below - with Adolfo  on the panga Dos Hermanos
after the long run to Puerto Vicente Guerrero





Inshore: The inshore is still holding up very well. There are roosters, but they remain down south at Vicente Guerrero. On Monday, Adolfo made the run and got 8 roosters.
Cheva, on the panga Dos Hermanos II, fly fished with Vico Rust. He was humbled by the large jack crevalle they got into by the white rocks. However, they had some success, and are going out again with Cheva this next Sunday.
Mark Denison, down at La Barrita, didn’t have much time to fish this week. He had a caravan of 14 motor homes pull into his camp site. He was prepared, and had spaces with electrical hookups. Plus, a dump station. The few campers who fished, had a great time from the shore there.
I am going to La Barrita tomorrow to take some stainless steel bolts with me so Mark can mount my leaning post on the bow of the new panga we are using down at Puerto Vicente.
Ed Kunze
(Director of the Roosterfish Foundation, IGFA Representative)

jueves, 31 de enero de 2019

Z Fish Report (1/31/19)



Offshore (average) surface water temperature - Includes from the 5 - 6 mile mark at the 100 fathom line, then to the 1,000 fathom line being about 32 miles: 83°

Inshore (average) surface temperature. From the beach to about 5 miles: 83°
Blue water: (Chlorophyll amounts and surface temps from Terrafin SST) Almost blue water from the beach to way out. The slight discoloring of the water near the beach has really turned on the inshore fishing for the roosterfish. (see below photo).
Offshore: After this late in the month full moon phase, we are finally getting some sailfish action. It now almost into February, which used to be a very good month for sailfish 30 years ago. The boats are averaging 6-8 raised sailfish to the spread for each boat, each day this week. Plus, about 3 – 4 hooked fish on conventional gear.
I questioned several of the captains about this late arrival, because 30 years ago, January was fantastic also. They are all optimistic, at least for another couple of seasons. They told me it was a change in the current conditions, not binging the sailfish close to shore. They are happy now, and there will be no reprimand on the long lines run out of pangas.
The fact fewer people are fishing this year is still lost on them, blaming the press in the States.

With Adolfo
Inshore: Cheva, on the panga Dos Hermanos II, has been running up north to the Ranch. He has been doing well on the tasty sierras, large jack crevalle, and even released a 40 pound roosterfish.
Mark Denison, down at La Barrita, took client Rob Anderson, from Burnaby, B.C. to Vicente Guerrero. They got several of the smaller roosters, spawned there in October, and one nice rooster. The small roosters, perfect for an 8wt fly rod, came with every cast. Mark said it was like a 3 pound trout on steroids.
And, what a difference a few days make. Adolfo, on the panga Dos Hermanos went to the same areas and got 12 roosters, from 25 to 30 pounds on spin gear.   
Ed Kunze
(Director of the Roosterfish Foundation, IGFA Representative)

jueves, 10 de enero de 2019

Z Fish Report (1/10/19)



And now you know why the Spanish word is dorado - the golden one. Rob
McCrea , of Vancouver, Canada took this dorado, and a nice  sailfish with
Jesus (hey-soos), on the panga  Dos Hermanos III
Offshore (average) surface water temperature - Includes from the 5 - 6 mile mark at the 100 fathom line, then to the 1,000 fathom line being about 32 miles: 84°

Inshore (average) surface temperature. From the beach to about 5 miles: 84°


Blue water: (Chlorophyll amounts and surface temps from Terrafin SST) Almost blue water from the beach to way out. (see below photos).


Offshore: We are in trouble. This was the beginning of the best two weeks of the year for sailfish. We have warm water, even though there does seem to be a cooling trend, and we are averaging only 1 sailfish a day per boat. The new moon was this last Sunday, on the 6th, and should have triggered the bite. WTF is happening?
And, it was great to go to the pier in the mornings this week and see pangas lined up side by side to pick up their clients, with several cruisers backed up and waiting for theirs, for a bit later departure. But, it will not last long if our bread and butter sailfish are no longer here.
As an IGFA representative for more than 15 years, it has been frustrating to me. The IGFA is all about conservation, yet the IGFA is a U.S. based operation. Mexico will not acknowledge the IGFA, at least as far as the need for enforcement to protect the species.
Optimists (usually the captains themselves) say the currents are changing, and the fish will be here soon. Realistic people understand the problems of long lines and over fishing, with no law enforcement. The captains also understand this, but it is just too hard for them to accept that their brothers and cousins have been taking away their livelihood. Like the buffalo, they assume “there are so many, our life is secure for many generations to come.”  The long lining pangas are family members, and the sport fishing captain’s hands are tied.
With my 20+ years of living here, and respected by the captains, I fall into the realistic category. However, a gringo, no matter how many years he has lived here, and no matter what common sense has been preached for 20 years for catch and release by the sport fishing captains, which is now practiced, I am out of the loop. They want to handle the problem themselves. NO OUTSIDERS. They think outsiders can’t possibly understand the situation.
As Gringos, we have a tendency to see things in black and white. Yet this situation is 100% grey. And, they are right. Several years ago, when the late John Dean, who set up the web page for Alfredo for the Esturion boats, and handled their bookings, tried to be involved with the long line controversy. They were fishing one day, and saw a long line. When they pulled up alongside, picked it up out of the water to cut it, Alfredo was crushed. “John, we can’t cut this one. I recognize the knots. It is my cousins.”   
Think of the implications. How does a captain recognize the line and knots used on a particular long line? To me, it is double speak, and we, as outsiders, will never be able to understand or help the situation.
The only thing I can say now, in absence of fish in the best fishing period of the year for sailfish is “KILL A BILLFISH, NO TIP:” I don’t care who the captain is, or the circumstances. The captain will benefit monetarily by the kill. He will either eat it, or sell it. There is no need for additional compensation.
Another example is the farsighted mind of Adolfo, on the panga Dos Hermanos. With no family members involved in the long line industry, he approached me to teach his 15 year old son, Adolfo Jr., the aspects of inshore spin fishing and fly fishing, including offshore fly fishing. Adolfo knew his son’s future was inshore, spin or fly fishing.

Above and below: On the panga Dos Hermanos  with Adolfo


This came about shortly after Cheva, Adolfo’s partner on the panga Dos Hermanos II, and I delivered a boat trailer to a friend up in Manzanillo. When Cheva and I arrived at the municipal pier, all we saw were long line pangas. There were over two hundred in the area. They didn’t even try to hide the illegal long lines. They were protected by the local government, with “shark” permits. It did not matter there was not a single long line with a stainless steel cable leader for sharks, all had mono leaders for sailfish and dorado. And, the local mayor even owned a few of the pangas equipped with long lines for sailfish.
Adolfo, is arguably the best captain in the port here, for any species, and the undisputed absolute best captain for roosterfish in the Americas, which is their only habitat. He asked me, a gringo, to teach his 15 year old son, Adolfo Jr. Which I did on weekends with clients, and school holidays when he was available.

Adolfo’s logic was sound.
1)  He had Jesus (Hey-sus) as his deckhand for 10 years. He couldn’t supplement Jesus as his deckhand until Jr. was ready. When Jr. was 18, Adolfo bought the third panga, Dos Hermanos III, for Jesus to captain, and Jr. became the deckhand for his dad.
2)  Adolfo would probably have been tougher on his son than I was. He demanded perfection, which Jr. had not yet achieved.
3)  Jr. learned and learned well. He is fantastic with the teaser rod for all species for fly fishing. His spin casts go a mile, and onto the beach, beyond the foam.
4)  In a few more years, Jr. will take over, and he will be ready.

Above and below: Well earned tiritas at Lily's for Knute
Olsen,  his son Agustus  and dad. They are from Montana 




Inshore: like last week, it is the best bet this week, and probably next week also. We are getting lots of large jack crevalle, several of the tasty sierras, and lots of the hard fighting black skipjack tuna, which are much larger than years past. And, even though it is getting too late in the year for roosters, and the inshore water is very clear, there are still a few roosters around.
Rob also fished a day with mark Deison down at Puerto Vicente Guerrero. The
clear water made for tough fishing, with only a nice jack to show for a hard day.
Due to the clear water, the best action is now taking place a few hundred yards off the beach, with a lot of fish being caught.
Ed Kunze
(Director of the Roosterfish Foundation, IGFA Representative)

jueves, 27 de diciembre de 2018

Z Fish Report (12/27/18)



For those who have never fished Puerto Vicente Guerrero, either by making
the long run with Adolfo, or fishing with either me or Mark. You are now
looking at some serious roosterfish country.
Offshore (average) surface water temperature - Includes from the 5 - 6 mile mark at the 100 fathom line, then to the 1,000 fathom line being about 32 miles: 87°

Above and below: Brent Ross of Eugene Oregon, fished with Cheva on the
panga Dos Hermaonos II today for several black skipjack tuna, large jack crevalle,
 and even the tasty sierras




Inshore (average) surface temperature. From the beach to about 5 miles: 87°
Blue water: (Chlorophyll amounts and surface temps from Terrafin SST) Almost blue water from the beach to way out. (see below photo).
Offshore: The action has slowed, for all offshore species, with tuna not being around at all. The sailfish action has been slow this week, as expected with the full moon. This will pick up, as the next three weeks will be the best weeks of the year for sailfish. And, the water is still very warm.
If the action doesn’t pick up considerably, we are all in trouble from the effects of over fishing by commercial fishing using lines. No matter the laws in place, the countries of Mexico, Guatemala, and Costa Rica do not enforce the commercial long line operations they all have. Costa Rica and Guatemala boast about their laws for sport fishing and using circle hooks only, but long line commercial fishing is just as strong there as Mexico. On the surface, what sounds good to us sport fishermen, is just a smoke screen to reality.
I have my doubts the sailfish action this next few weeks will be as good as just a couple of years ago, and certainly not like we had 20 years ago.
And then there is Adolfo, on the panga Dos Hermanos. Who would have thought
there were roosters and huge jacks just off the beach at Ixtapa Island, and Club
Med? His  French client even took a pargo on the surface popper. 





Inshore: The best bet this week, and probably next week also. We are getting lots of large jack crevalle, several of the tasty sierras, lots of the hard fighting black skipjack tuna. And, even though it is getting to late in the year for roosters, and the inshore water is very clear, there are still a few roosters around.

Due to the clear water, the best action is now taking place a few hundred yards off the beach, with a lot of fishing being caught.
Ed Kunze

(Director of the Roosterfish Foundation, IGFA Representative)





jueves, 20 de diciembre de 2018

Z Fish Report (12/20/18)

On the panga Dos Hermanos with Adolfo

Offshore (average) surface water temperature - Includes from the 5 - 6 mile mark at the 100 fathom line, then to the 1,000 fathom line being about 32 miles: 84°

Inshore (average) surface temperature. From the beach to about 5 miles: 84°
Blue water: (Chlorophyll amounts and surface temps from Terrafin SST) Almost blue water from the beach to way out. (see below photo).
Offshore: The action has slowed, for all species, with tuna not being around at all. The sailfish will get even slower going into the full moon period this week.
It was small, but it was Gary's first rooster, and released
to get bigger
Inshore: A disappointing week for roosters, and even jack crevalle. Roosters made themselves scarce and were very tough to find, even with the preferable 84° water.
Gary, above, Cheva, and Jim below with a few of the jack crevalle they got



Early in the week a lot of jack crevalle were taken, and a few sierras. But, as the strong blue water current took over, clear up to the back side of the waves, even the jacks were spooky, and tough to find.


Gary Meger, of Ontario, Canada fished two days with Cheva on the panga Dos Hermanos II. They made the long run to the Ranch for Gary’s first rooster. Gary emailed me they also got a few black skipjacks and sierras, with the action mostly off the beach. On the second day, he and his friend Jim Forsyth, also from Ontario, Canada, got into the large jack crevalle with Cheva. They had 4 double hookups. I teased Gary about having fun, and his response back was the damage to his body the jacks gave him. If you have been there and done that, you understand. 

Ed Kunze
(Director of the Roosterfish Foundation, IGFA Representative)



jueves, 13 de diciembre de 2018

Z Fish Report (12/13/18)

Matt, Wade, Derrick, and Brent rewarded themselves after three days of fishing
with Cheva on the panga Dos Hermanos II, and Jesus (Hey-zus) on the panga  Dos
 Hermanos III. They were at the the Mirador restaurant above  Art's store on the pier. 

Offshore (average) surface water temperature - Includes from the 5 - 6 mile mark at the 100 fathom line, then to the 1,000 fathom line being about 32 miles: 84°
With Adolfo on the panga Dos Hermanos
Inshore (average) surface temperature. From the beach to about 5 miles: 84°
Wade with Jesus

Blue water: (Chlorophyll amounts and surface temps from Terrafin SST) Clean water starts at the 100 fathom line, and on out. On northerly headings, heavy releases of fresh water from the Rio Balsas are making the water green (see below photo).
Offshore: The action has been scattered, with fish taken at the 13 mile mark, on out to 20 miles. Some captains hit a day with five sailfish, others only get a couple of strikes. The dorado are picking up some, with at least one per boat.
A nice sailfish from the North Dakota boys
Matt, from North Dakota emailed me this: Wade and I had a good day in Jesus’s boat, the panga Dos Hermanos III. We raised 5 sail strikes, hooked all 5 and landed 4 with 3 released. All were the same size in that 70-90lb range approximately. Wade also caught a nice dorado cow and bonito were caught as well.
With Adolfo
The other boat did well which was Brent and Derrick with Cheva, on the dos Hermanos II. Derrick landed his first sail fish and Brent got a large cow dorado and also landed a sail. Their boat had 3 strikes and landed all three, with the sails being released. Fishing was about 20 miles out in the blue water.
Nice sierras with Adolfo
Inshore: All three Dos Hermanos pangas had a great week. Adolfo, picked up a couple of nice roosters way down at Vicente Guerrero, then the next day, went way up to the north to the Ranch, and scored big. They came across a large migration school of huge roosters, and they were feeding. Six large roosters later, averaging 40 pounds, and even losing one estimate to close to 80 pounds, the bite ended. The large gallo was lost about 15 feet from the boat.
With Cheva

With Jesus



Jeff Ow, from Vancouver, BC fished a day with Cheva’s oldest son, Anibel. The charter was set up at the last minute, and I did not have time to explain the type of fly line or leaders to bring for his 7 wt switch fly rod, which was set up for steelhead. This is what he emailed me. “It was great! Had a tough time casting on the rocking panga so ended up trolling instead. Lol. Learnt a ton and caught a bunch of black skipjack tuna and a jack. Saw a humpback whale and her calf. All in all, a good day. Will need to work on casting on a rocking chair when I get home.” 

I have emailed him a copy of my book, The Rooster and the Fly.


Ed Kunze
(Director of the Roosterfish Foundation, IGFA Representative)